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Pacific Islands Development Program, East-West Center

With Support From Center for Pacific Islands Studies, University of Hawai‘i


New Palau President’s Cabinet Unofficially Named
Multiple ministry shuffles may be expected for 2013

KOROR, Palau (Island Times, Dec. 14, 2012) – With a few weeks left before the transition from the 8th to the 9th Constitutional Government, some names of those who will possibly be in President-elect Tommy Remengesau Jr.’s cabinet have recently come to light.

Island Times source said Vice President-elect Antonio Bells is eyed to be Justice Minister, this despite his earlier statement that he would like to head Ministry of Finance.

Outgoing Del. Secilil Eldebechel, who currently chairs the House committee on ways and means, is reportedly eyed to be minister of Finance. Former Finance Min. Elbuchel Sadang, who currently chairs the Transition Committee, is also eyed for the same position.

But Sadang reportedly wants to give way to younger ones. The source said Sadang wants to see more young professionals in the government. Additionally, Sadang reportedly said that he enjoys his work at the Palau Conservation Society.

Former Social Security Administrator Greg Ngirmang and Dr. Stevenson Kuartei are reportedly eyed to be Health Minister.

Bureau of Arts and Culture Dir. Dwight Alexander is reportedly eyed to be Community and Cultural Affairs Minister.

Koror State Elementary Principal and overall chairperson of the Executive Committee on Transition and Inauguration Andrew Tabelual and Division of School Management Chief Sinton Soalablai are considered to be Education Minister.

Former Resource and Development Min. Fritz Koshiba is reportedly eyed to be minister of Public Infrastructure, Industries and Commerce.

Former senator Alan Seid is reportedly eyed to be State Minister.

For Natural Resources, Environment and Tourism Minister, Rhinehart Silas is reportedly considered.

Island Times: www.islandtimes.us
Copyright 2012 Island Times. All Rights Reserved


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